The Global Initiative Network

Expert

James Windle

Lecturer in Criminology, University College Cork

Dr. James Windle, is a Lecturer in Criminology at University College Cork (Ireland). His research focuses on illicit drug markets, drug policy, illicit enterprise, street gangs and organised crime. He is author of Suppressing Illicit Opium Production: Successful Intervention in Asia and the Middle East (IB Taurus, 2016) and lead editor of Historical Perspectives on Organized Crime and Terrorism (Routledge, 2018).

He has published in a range of peer-reviewed journals, including the European Journal of Criminology, International Journal of Drug Policy, Crime, Law & Social Control, Third World Quarterly, and Trends in Organized Crime.

Publications

Books

  • Windle, J., Morrison, J.F., Winter, A. and Silke, A. (2018). Historical Perspectives on Organised Crime and Terrorism. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Windle, J. (2016). Suppressing Illicit Opium Production in Asia and the Middle East: Successful Intervention and National Drug Policies. London: I.B. Taurus/Bloomsbury.

Journal Articles

  • Windle, J., Moyle, L., & Coomber, R. (2020). ‘Vulnerable’ Kids Going Country: Children and Young People’s Involvement in County Lines Drug Dealing. Youth justice, 20(1-2), 64-78.
  • Windle, J., & Silke, A. (2019). Is drawing from the state ‘state of the art’?: a review of organised crime research data collection and analysis, 2004–2018. Trends in Organized Crime, 22(4), 394-413.
  • Windle, J. (2018). ‘Why do South-East Asian States Choose to Suppress Opium? A Cross-case Comparison’. Third World Quarterly, 39(2): 366-384.
  • Windle, J. (2018). The impact of the Great Recession on the Irish drug market. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 18(5), 548-567.
  • Hourigan, N., Morrison, J.F., Windle, J. and Silke, A. (2018). ‘Crime in Ireland, North and South: Feuding Gangs and Profiteering Paramilitaries’. Trends in Organized Crime, 21(2): 126-146.
  • Carroll, P. and Windle, J. (2018). ‘Cyber as an Enabler of Terrorism Financing, Now and in the Future’, Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism, 13(3): 285-300.
  • Windle, J. (2016). ‘Re: Morality and Non-Medical Drug Use’. BMJ: British Medical Journal.
  • Windle, J. (2016). ‘Security Trumps Drug Control: How Securitization Explains Drug Policy Paradoxes in Thailand and Vietnam’. Drugs: Education, Prevention & Policy, 23(4), 344-354
  • Windle, J. and Briggs, D. (2015). ‘Going Solo: The Social Organisation of Drug Dealers within a London Gang’. Journal of Youth Studies, 18(9): 1170-1185
  • Windle, J. and Briggs, D. (2015). ‘It’s Like Working Away for Two Weeks: Child Exploitation in a Saturated Drugs Market’. Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 17(2): 105-119.
  • Windle, J. and Farrell, G. (2012). ‘Popping the Balloon Effect: Assessing Drug Law Enforcement in Terms of Displacement, Diffusion and the Containment Hypothesis’. Substance Use and Misuse, 47(8/9): 868-876.

Chapters

  • Windle, J., Morrison, J.F., Winter, A. and Silke, A. (2018). ‘Hawking the Historical Case Study Method in Terrorism and Organised Crime Studies’. In Windle, J., Morrison, J.F., Winter, A. and Silke, A. (Eds.). Historical Perspectives on Organised Crime and Terrorism. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Windle, J. (2018). ‘“He just wasn’t the Bloke I Used to Know”: Social Capital and the Fragmentation of a British Organised Crime Network’. In Windle, J., Morrison, J.F., Winter, A. and Silke, A. (Eds.). Historical Perspectives on Organised Crime and Terrorism. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Windle, J. (2015). ‘Drugs and Drug Policy in Thailand’. Improving Global Drug Policy: Comparative Perspectives and UNGASS 2016. In Felbab-Brown, V. and Trinkus, H. (Ed.) Washington: Brookings Institute.
  • Windle, J. (2015). ‘A Slow March from Social Evil to Harm Reduction: Drugs and Drug Policy in Vietnam’. In Improving Global Drug Policy: Comparative Perspectives and UNGASS 2016. In Felbab-Brown, V. and Trinkus, H. (Ed.) Washington: Brookings Institute. Media
  • Windle, J. and Sweeney, K. (2020). What can Ireland do about the exploitation of vulnerable peoples by out-of-town drug dealers? RTE Brainstorm.
  • Windle, J. (2017). ‘Four Steps Donald Trump Can Take to Help End the U.S. Heroin Epidemic’. Newsweek, 23rd February 2017