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This report is a broad overview of Africa’s multiple and changing connections to global criminal markets.

Over the past two decades, Africa’s role in the global criminal economy has shifted. The impact of organised crime is widespread and growing, yet it is little understood. In this report, the ENACT project focuses on understanding organised crime in Africa by examining wider trends in the global criminal economy.


About the author

Mark Shaw is director of the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime and Senior Associate of the LSE International Drug Policy Unit, (LSE US Centre). He was until recently National Research Foundation Professor of Justice and Security at the University of Cape Town’s Centre of Criminology, where he is now an adjunct professor. He formally worked in several capacities at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

Author

Mark Shaw

Mark is the Director of the Global Initiative, an Adjunct Professor at the University of Cape Town, and Senior Associate of the LSE International Drug Policy Unit, (LSE US Centre).

He was previously the National Research Foundation Professor of Justice and Security at the University of Cape Town, Department of Criminology.   Prior to joining UCT, Mark was a Director at a boutique consulting firm specialising in fragile states and transnational threats.  Mark lead projects and provided technical assistance to national governments, bilateral donors and international organisations in Libya, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia, West Africa, the Sahel and Southern Africa, on security sector and criminal justice reform, and countering transnational threats.

Mark worked for ten years at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), including as Inter-regional Advisor, Chief of the Criminal Justice Reform Unit and with the Global Programme against Transnational Organised Crime, with extensive field work.  A South African national, before joining the UN, Mark held a number of positions in government and civil society where he worked on issues of public safety and urban violence in the post-apartheid transition.  He holds a PhD from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and has published widely on organised crime, security and justice reform issues.

 

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