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Without significant cooperation between nations and the adoption of new strategies, law enforcement will be left behind, fighting 21st century crime with 19th century tools. Cybercrime has challenged policing capacity in unprecedented ways, demanding increasing cooperation between states, and requiring a more effective investigation capacity. The J-CAT is a Member States led initiative facilitated by Europol’s Cybercrime Center, EC3. This initiative is the first of its kind, born out of frustration with traditional tools available to law enforcement, the J- CAT has illustrated the importance of developing a task force based in a single physical location, governed by a flexible administrative framework, and that elicits the trust of Member States. The J- CAT has prioritised joint investigations on some of the most heinous Internet enabled crimes, including online sexual exploitation of minors, vicious botnets and identity theft rings. The result is an effective platform to collaborate across multiple borders and coordinate international investigations with partners, maximising the effectiveness of international joint and coordinated actions against key cyber threats and top targets. This practitioners’ note outlines the genesis and operations of the J-CAT, identifying key success strategies, lessons learned and opportunities for the future.

Innovations in International Cooperation to Counter Cybercrime, 2015

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Authors

Tuesday Reitano

Tuesday Reitano is Deputy Director at the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime and a senior research advisor at the Institute for Security Studies in Pretoria, where she leads the ENACT programme on behalf of the GI.

Tuesday was formerly the director of CT MORSE, an independent policy and monitoring unit for the EU’s programmes in counter-terrorism, and for 12 years was a policy specialist in the UN System, including with the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Development Group (UNDG) and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

In this time, she has amassed a wealth of experience in fragile states and development working both with states, civil society and at the community level to strengthen resilience to transnational threats, promote sustainable development and the rule of law. Tuesday has authored a number of policy orientated and academic reports with leading institutions such as the UN, World Bank and OECD on topics ranging from organized crime’s evolution and impact in Africa, on human smuggling, illicit financial flows, and the nexus between crime, terrorism, security and development.

Tuesday is the lead author of a forthcoming OECD flagship publication: Illicit Financial Flows: Criminal Economies in West Africa, co-author of Migrant, Refugee; Smuggler, Saviour, a book published in 2016 by Hurst on the role of smugglers in Europe’s migration crisis, and the editor of Militarised Responses to Organised Crime: War on Crime, published by Palgrave in 2017.

She holds three Masters Degrees in Business Administration (MBA), Public Administration (MPA) and an MSc in Security, Conflict and International Development (MSc). Tuesday is based in Geneva, Switzerland, with her family.

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Troels Oerting

Troels Oerting is Managing Director of Cyber Security, Barclays Bank Group, London. He started in the Danish Police back in 1980 and went through the ranks serving as Director of the Danish NCIS, Director of National Crime Squad and later as Director of the Danish Serious Organized Crime Agency (SOCA). He held positions as Head of NCB Copenhagen, Chair of the Head of Europol National Unit group (HENU), member of DK Europol Management Board delegation and Head of DK Schengen / Sirene. Later he became Director of Operations in the Danish Security Intelligence Service and was promoted to Assistant Director in Europol in 2009. He has had various responsibilities in Europol’s Operational Department and serves now as Head of European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) and Interim Head of Europol Counter Terrorist and Financial Intelligence Centre.

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Marcena Hunter

Marcena is a Senior Analyst at the Global Initiative against Transnational Organized Crime, which she has been with since 2012. Marcena provides research for a number of Global Initiatives projects, analysing a diverse range of organized crime flows, including illicit financial flows, and developing responses. While her work covers a wide scope of material and geographic spread, her current work has focused on development responses to organized crime and the West Africa region. Marcena previously worked with STATT, a boutique global consulting firm, where she analysed migration flows and guided security sector and criminal justice reform. Her past work also includes projects improving access to justice, analysing gender issues, and supporting the Voluntary Trust Fund for Victims of Human Trafficking at the UNODC. Marcena has a JD from Washington and Lee University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Denver. She is currently based in Queensland, Australia.

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